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How to Detect and Diagnose Dengue Fever Symptoms?

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How to Detect and Diagnose Dengue Fever Symptoms?
Latest company news about How to Detect and Diagnose Dengue Fever Symptoms?

Dengue fever is a viral infection transmitted to humans by mosquitoes that live in tropical and subtropical climates and carry the virus. Blood testing detects the dengue virus or antibodies produced in response to dengue infection.

 

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), dengue infections have been reported in more than 100 countries from parts of Africa, the Americas, the Caribbean, the Eastern Mediterranean, Southeast Asia, and the Western Pacific. It is a fast emerging infectious disease, according to the World Health Organization (WHO), with an increasing number of cases and countries affected throughout the world. The actual number is not known because about 75% of cases are asymptomatic, but a recent estimate put the number of annual dengue infections as high as 390 million. Approximately 50 to 100 million symptomatic cases occur annually worldwide.

 

Dengue fever is usually diagnosed via some combination of blood tests because the body's immune response to the virus is dynamic and complex. Laboratory tests may include:

 

Molecular tests for dengue virus (PCR)—detect the presence of the virus itself; these tests can diagnose dengue fever up to 7 days after the onset of symptoms and can be used to determine which of the 4 different serotypes of dengue virus is causing the infection.

Antibody tests, IgM and IgG—detect antibodies produced by the immune system when a person has been exposed to the virus; these tests are most effective when performed at least 4 days after exposure.

 

Complete blood count (CBC)—to look for low platelet count typical of the later stages of the illness and to detect the decrease in hemoglobin, hematocrit, and red blood cell (RBC) count (evidence of anemia) that would occur with blood loss associated with severe dengue fever

Basic metabolic panel (BMP) – to monitor kidney function and look for evidence of dehydration that can occur with severe illness

 

Dengue fever testing is used to determine whether a person with signs and symptoms and recent potential exposure has been infected with the dengue virus. The infection is difficult to diagnose without laboratory tests because symptoms may initially resemble those of other diseases, such as chikungunya infection. Two primary types of testing are available:

 

Molecular testing (polymerase chain reaction, PCR)—this type of test detects the genetic material of the dengue virus in blood within the first week after symptoms appear (fever) and can be used to determine which of the 4 serotypes is causing the infection. One type of Real Time RT-PCR test can detect dengue and the two other mosquito-borne viruses, Zika and chikungunya, and distinguish between the three. Only certain public health laboratories are able to provide the test after verifying that they can successfully perform the assay. Though the test is not available in hospitals or clinics, healthcare practitioners are able to order it through their state and local public health departments. Results can take from four days to two weeks, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Molecular tests of blood are not likely to detect the virus after 7 days of illness. If the result of a PCR test is negative, an antibody test can be used to help establish a diagnosis, according to the CDC (see below).

 

Antibody tests—these tests are primarily used to help diagnose a current or recent infection. They detect two different classes of antibodies produced by the body in response to a dengue fever infection, IgG and IgM. Diagnosis may require a combination of these tests because the body's immune system produces varying levels of antibodies over the course of the illness.

IgM antibodies are produced first and tests for these are most effective when performed at least 7-10 days after exposure. Levels in the blood rise for a few weeks, then gradually decrease. After a few months, IgM antibodies fall below detectable levels.

 

IgG antibodies are produced more slowly in response to an infection. Typically, the level rises with an acute infection, stabilizes, and then persists long-term. Individuals who have been exposed to the virus prior to the current infection maintain a level of IgG antibodies in the blood that can affect the interpretation of diagnostic results.

Pub Time : 2021-06-30 14:06:36 >> News list
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